Reporting Swine Enteric Coronavirus Disease

As mandated in the federal order, veterinarians and producers must report suspect, presumptive-positive and test-positive herds. Please use the case definitions below to determine reportability of cases:

Suspect herd: A swine herd in which one or more age groups are affected with acute, contagious, watery diarrhea.

Presumptive positive herd: A swine herd with one or more positive pigs, tested by PCR, VI, and/or viral genetic sequencing, with either nonspecific, unknown or no clinical signs or history consistent with SECD.

Confirmed positive herd: A swine herd with one or more confirmed positive cases, that include pigs that:

    1. Tested positive for PEDV, PDCoV, or other emerging swine enteric coronavirus by PCR, VI and/or viral genetic sequencing; and
    2. Have a history of clinical signs consistent with SECD.

To report PEDv or other swine enteric coronaviruses to the Board, send an email (and attach related documents) to swine.disease@state.mn.us or use our SECD Reporting Form.

Sample Submission

Your swine farm’s national premises identification number (PIN) must be listed on the laboratory’s submission form. This allows diagnostic laboratories to report test results and also eliminates the need to list your name and address on the submission form. If you are interested in obtaining barcode stickers for ease of sample identification, please contact the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at (800) 605-8787.

Negative Premises/Herd Declaration

To determine whether a premises/herd is free of SECD, producers and veterinarians can follow these instructions and testing protocols. Please remember to include the premises identification number (PIN) on all laboratory submissions.

Please note that there are different criteria for all in/all out and continuous flow.

To have the premises or herd declared negative, this form needs to be completed.

Once completed, please email the form, with “SECD” in the subject line, to: VSMN@aphis.usda.gov.

Guidance on Using SECD Forms

To enter into fee-based agreements with the USDA, veterinarians, producers and other vendors must complete the forms to the right and mail to:

USDA-APHIS-VS
ATTN:SECD
251 Starkey Street, Suite 229
Saint Paul, MN 55107

For questions on how to use or fill out the forms, please send an email with "SECD" in the subject line to:

VSMN@aphis.usda.gov
Or contact Kelly Neisen:
Cell: (651) 260-4570
Fax: (651) 228-0654

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus

On June 5, 2014, the U.S. Department of Agriculture issued a federal order that requires producers, veterinarians and diagnostic laboratories to report herds that are positive with swine enteric coronavirus diseases (SECD), specifically porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) and porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV). The federal order also requires producers to work with a veterinarian to develop and follow a herd management plan to minimize the spread and impact of the disease.

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus does not affect people and is not a food safety concern.

History of PEDv in the U.S.

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) was discovered in the U.S. in April 2013. At the onset, symptoms including severe diarrhea and vomiting in young pigs led farmers and veterinarians to believe the disease was Transmissible Gastroenteritis (TGE), a disease commonly found in pigs in the U.S. It was soon evident that this disease was something different, causing more significant death loss in piglets. First identified in Europe in the 1970s, PEDv has become common in Asia and has also been confirmed in Canada. How the disease entered the U.S. swine population is unknown.

PIN Tags for Breeding Stock

Imagine if the management tags you use for your sows or boars benefited the pork industry by better targeting surveillance for pseudorabies and swine brucellosis in harvest channels. This could become a reality, thanks to a premises identification number (PIN) tag pilot program.

Visit the Pork Checkoff website for more information.

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) is a disease in pigs that causes animal suffering and results in major economic loss. Since the 1980s PRRS has been common in the U.S. and Minnesota is no exception.

According to the Minnesota Pork Board, our state ranks second nationally in the number of hogs raised and second in the value of the animals sold for meat processing. Swine producers care about their animals and work hard to raise a quality product. PRRS can cause mild to severe respiratory issues in all age pigs, abortions in sows, and premature and poor-doing baby pigs. The swine community continues to work to understand how to control the spread of the virus while caring for the animals. The virus that causes PRRS can spread through many mediums including semen, nasal discharge, contaminated equipment, and through the air. Because the virus moves around so easily, PRRS is difficult to contain and nearly impossible to eradicate completely.

PRRS is not a reportable disease but has greatly impacted the state’s pork sector. Minnesota has taken an active role in PRRS research and is participating in a regional elimination project. To minimize risk of disease transmission of any kind, we encourage the implementation of biosecurity standards set by our industry partners.

Garbage Feeding (Class A)

Feeding food waste to livestock is also known as garbage feeding. Garbage feeding can be an economical and nutritious form of animal feed, but it must be done properly. Food waste that contains meat or has been exposed to meat has the potential to carry disease. Our rules set standards for how garbage needs to be handled and cooked so that foot-and-mouth disease, hog cholera and other harmful diseases stay out of Minnesota.

Producers who would like to feed garbage to livestock can do so by first contacting the Board to request a Class A permit. One of our agricultural advisors will then schedule a visit to get the details including source of the garbage and the producer’s plans for hauling and cooking. Once a permit is granted it is good for one year. The permit is an agreement between the producer and the Board that garbage fed to livestock will be thoroughly heated to at least 212 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes. Additionally, trucks that haul garbage over public roads must be leak-proof, and rodents and pests must be kept away from uncooked garbage on the farm. We inspect garbage feeding farms each month to make sure these important rules are followed.

Though permitted producers could feed garbage to any type of livestock or poultry, there are currently only hog farms on the list in Minnesota. In the past, there have been as many as 40 permits to feed garbage in the state. Today, there are seven permitted producers.

Exempt Materials Feeding (Class B)

Feeding food waste to livestock is also known as garbage feeding. Garbage feeding can be an economical and nutritious form of animal feed, but it must be done properly. Food waste that contains meat or has been exposed to meat has the potential to carry disease. Our rules set standards for how garbage needs to be handled and cooked so that foot-and-mouth disease, hog cholera and other harmful diseases stay out of Minnesota.

Food waste that has never had contact with meat is known as exempt materials. Some examples of exempt materials include bakery items, cereals and candy that came directly from the store or food processing plant. Producers who wish to feed non-meat food waste to animals may do so by obtaining a Board-issued Class B permit to feed exempt materials. Exempt materials do not need to be cooked before feeding to livestock. Exempt materials include

Exempt (class B) materials are fed to cattle and pigs. In total, 22 producers have permits to feed exempt materials.

Feral Swine

Feral swine are pigs that live in the wild. Feral pigs carry diseases that have been eradicated in livestock, and pose a threat to commercial hogs and other domestic animals. Feral swine are known to be present mainly in the southern U.S., and we do all that we can to make sure they stay out of Minnesota.

Our rules prohibit importing feral swine or swine that were feral during any part of their lifetime into Minnesota. Products from feral swine that may be imported include cut and wrapped meat, hides, teeth and finished taxidermy mounts.